Cultural Communities - Hispanic

Submitted on: Saturday, November 16, 2013, 6:13 pm

From the cozy confines of our twenty-first century world with its 24/7 news channels and instant access to the Internet, it is easy to delude ourselves into thinking that we know all there is to know about our past. Not so. More than a dozen years ago as I was just beginning my midlife pursuit of degrees in American history at the University of Colorado at Denver, Prof. James Whiteside cautioned me saying, “If you aren’t comfortable with ambiguity, don’t study history.”  The good professor’s words hung in the back of my mind as I read Season of Terror: The Espinosas in Central Colorado,...

Submitted on: Tuesday, November 20, 2012, 3:43 pm

An interview with William Convery, Colorado State Historian; filmed at Denver Public Library, Denver, Colorado, February 24, 2010.  William Convery discusses the history of Colorado, Hispanics in Colorado, and the Pueblo Revolt, among other topics

 

Submitted on: Sunday, August 19, 2012, 11:13 am

On the most basic level, Florence and the Butterflies is a compilation of bedtime stories told to a kid growing up in Denver’s west side Auraria neighborhood. In and of themselves, they’re delightful to read. But Magdalena Gallegos’s new book represents something far more than a nostalgic re-telling of childhood stories. Within these stories and the commentary woven through them, we can find a character sketch of the author’s remarkable mother, a glimpse into Hispanic life on the farm and in the city, inspiration on creating joy and appreciation during hard economic times, and some...

Submitted on: Tuesday, July 31, 2012, 2:25 pm

Bonnie J. Clark offers a concise, dense, and richly textured account of daily life in the late-nineteenth-century Hispanic settlements of rural southeastern Colorado. In this book, she presents the results of her doctoral research at two Hispanic sites located within the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Area, just west of the Lower Purgatory River. Clark draws on numerous and diverse sources to craft a sense of the people who inhabited these places, and to explore the relationship between their identities—both as an ethnic group and as individuals—and their lived environment.

Historical...

Submitted on: Thursday, November 3, 2011, 10:29 am

Carole Counihan, an anthropology professor at Millersville University in Pennsylvania, spent ten years gathering “food-centered life histories” from Mexicana women in Antonito, a small town in Colorado’s San Luis Valley. The result of this research, the book A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis Valley of Colorado, is a fascinating ethnographic portrait of the way that food practices in the region have changed—and stayed the same—over the last century. More than that, this work reveals the complicated relationship of food with gender, ethnicity, family, work,...

Submitted on: Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 12:47 pm

Colorado—within our state boundaries is land once claimed by Spanish Kings and Mexican governors. Although Native people first lived in the region, the first Europeans to visit came from Spain. Early Hispanic families moved north from New Mexico to settle in Southern Colorado. During these...

Submitted on: Sunday, October 2, 2011, 8:35 pm

The edited collection Enduring Legacies: Ethnic Histories and Cultures of Colorado is a history of Colorado from the perspective of a variety of ethnic groups. The introduction clearly states the need for this book: “Despite Colorado’s remarkable ethnic, cultural, and racial diversity, the state’s dominant narrative expressed in museums, murals, and history tours often reflects an Anglo-Centric attitude that begins with the 1859 Pike’s Peak Gold Rush and the establishment of statehood in 1876” (2). The book adds a breadth of scholarship to Colorado history by including the stories of...

Submitted on: Friday, September 16, 2011, 4:02 pm

Colorado— within our state boundaries is land once claimed by Spanish Kings and Mexican governors. Although Native people first lived in the region, the first Europeans to visit came from Spain. Early Hispanic families moved north from New Mexico to settle in Southern Colorado. During these...

Submitted on: Friday, September 16, 2011, 3:59 pm

Colorado— within the state boundaries is land once claimed by Spanish kings and Mexican governors. Various tribes of Native people lived in this region for many centuries; however, the first Europeans to arrive in this area were from Spain and early Hispanic families moved from Mexico and New...

Submitted on: Friday, September 16, 2011, 3:49 pm

Colorado— within our state boundaries is land once claimed by Spanish Kings and Mexican governors. Although Native people first lived in the region, the first Europeans to visit came from Spain. Early Hispanic families moved north from New Mexico to settle in Southern Colorado. During these...

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